Wenatchee River Valley

Come along with naturalist and Land Trust Conservation Fellow Susan Ballinger on this low-key morning birding outing.  From beginner to expert, learn from fellow birders and hone your bird ID skills.

PESHASTIN — Volunteers came by the dozens on Saturday to build a riverfront trail on the old Peshastin Mill property, just west of Peshastin.

Many were members or friends of the Evergreen Mountain Bike Alliance, and the Complete the Loop Coalition.

Come along with naturalist and Land Trust Conservation Fellow Susan Ballinger on this low-key morning birding outing.  From beginner to expert, learn from fellow birders and hone your bird ID skills.

Come along with naturalist and Land Trust Conservation Fellow Susan Ballinger on this low-key morning birding outing.  From beginner to expert, learn from fellow birders and hone your bird ID skills.

Come along with naturalist and Land Trust Conservation Fellow Susan Ballinger on this low-key morning birding outing.  From beginner to expert, learn from fellow birders and hone your bird ID skills.

Come along with naturalist and Land Trust Conservation Fellow Susan Ballinger on this low-key morning birding outing.  From beginner to expert, learn from fellow birders and hone your bird ID skills.

Come along with naturalist and Land Trust Conservation Fellow Susan Ballinger on this low-key morning birding outing.  From beginner to expert, learn from fellow birders and hone your bird ID skills.

Come along with naturalist and Land Trust Conservation Fellow Susan Ballinger on this low-key morning birding outing.  From beginner to expert, learn from fellow birders and hone your bird ID skills.

Listen for the song of an American dipper while standing under a four hundred year old cedar tree. Feel the fur of beavers and the soft grey feathers of a great blue heron. Share lunch with a new friend in the breezy shade of a ponderosa pine. Learn from local experts, and find new places close to home to return to time and again.

In 2001, the Land Trust finalized its first conservation easement that helped preserve the character of the Wenatchee foothills. The Warm Springs easement is approximately 285 acres of shrub-steppe hillside and a canyon with a small creek that supports raptors, deer, and reptiles.