Lake Wenatchee Area

May 21, 2018          
 
Western Rivers Conservancy, Chelan-Douglas Land Trust, and the Lake Wenatchee Community team up to protect recreation and habitat across a spectacular mountainside over Lake Wenatchee

 

LAKE WENATCHEE — The Chelan-Douglas Land Trust and Western Rivers Conservancy have teamed up to work on permanently conserving Lake Wenatchee’s Nason Ridge.

“There’s a tremendous amount of interest in seeing this area conserved in the greater Lake Wenatchee community,” Sue Doroff, president of Western Rivers Conservancy, said Monday.

Every year, endangered Spring Chinook and threatened steelhead migrate up hundreds of miles of river, making their way to Nason Creek. Beginning in 2013, CDLT has worked to protect some of the most productive spawning and rearing locations on this tributary of the Wenatchee River.

In 1994 it came to public attention that 320 acres of land in and adjacent to the Glacier Peak Wilderness were planned for logging followed by housing development. The parcels were located along the very popular hiking trail to Spider Meadow at the head of the Chiwawa valley, near Lake Wenatchee.

SUCCESS!

We are thrilled to share big news - we have reached our $1 million Save Nason Ridge Campaign goal! The support of Land Trust members and the Lake Wenatchee community made this possible.

What does a healthy river mean for a healthy community? Clean, abundant water and healthy riparian habitat are vital for fish, wildlife and people. North Central Washington’s quality of life and economic vitality depend on the natural functions and scenic quality of our exceptional rivers, streams and lakes.

Lake Wenatchee and its tributaries the White River and the Little Wenatchee River are a priority focus area for the Chelan-Douglas Land Trust. Much of the headwaters of the White and Little Wenatchee Rivers are in wilderness near the crest of the Cascade Mountains, and are relatively pristine.

Rufus Woods

December 10, 2012

There is a growing recognition in our region of the linkage between economic development and conservation, which represents a shift in thinking from years past when it was assumed by many that the two values were mutually exclusive.